system requirements

General discussion about RailWorks, your thoughts, questions, news and views!

Moderator: Moderators

system requirements

Postby alanwbrown on Mon Mar 20, 2017 11:02 pm

Hi all

My PC has finally given up and a new one is needed.
Can someone enlighten me as to what are the ideal/best system requirements needed to run TS2017 in Windows 10.
Alan
alanwbrown
Been on the forums for a while
 
Posts: 129
Joined: Tue Feb 25, 2003 10:27 pm
Location: St Neots

Re: system requirements

Postby gptech on Tue Mar 21, 2017 12:48 am

Look at something along the lines of:

Intel i5 CPU....preferably a Skylake model
8GB as a minimum, 16GB if the budget allows----you can't have too much.
nVidia 960 or higher, same for a 10 series card. Once again, the more memory the better but 4GB of vRAM is a good starting point.
SSDs give the fastest disc reads, if one of those is a must consider a M.2 device (plus a motherboard that supports M.2) Ideally having Windows on it's own dedicated drive with your programs separate is the way to go.
Don't forget the power supply: 500W minimum but make sure it kicks out plenty of amps on the 12v rail---single rail units delivering 50A plus are often recommended.
gptech
Very Active Forum Member
 
Posts: 12361
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Wakefield, West Yorkshire

Re: system requirements

Postby gptech on Tue Mar 21, 2017 9:53 am

gptech wrote:Intel i5 CPU....preferably a Skylake model


That should be...."Intel i5 CPU....preferably a Skylake or the newer Kabylake model"
gptech
Very Active Forum Member
 
Posts: 12361
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Wakefield, West Yorkshire

Re: system requirements

Postby mikesimpson on Wed Mar 22, 2017 10:20 pm

I concur with Gary, but be careful with SSDs, they are real fast etc, but I have now had two fail completely, and when they fail they are completely dead, as much use as a block of chocolate but they don't taste very good :-( So if you do use them, make sure you have them backed up to an external USB drive on a regular basis.
Mike in OZ - Author of RW_Tools & Route-Riter.
User avatar
mikesimpson
Very Active Forum Member
 
Posts: 6194
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2001 12:00 am
Location: Southern Hemisphere Penal Colonies

Re: system requirements

Postby tubemad on Thu Mar 23, 2017 1:24 am

To save a new thread but on the same subject, my RW is starting to slow up and FSX is now unplayable, will this upgrade be pretty reasonable? I'm not up to scratch with AMD's but I prefer if Win 10 wasnt included and had a discount for a no OS option, I'd put Windows 7 in

http://www.maplin.co.uk/p/pc-specialist ... g-pc-a00xn
User avatar
tubemad
Very Active Forum Member
 
Posts: 2113
Joined: Wed Aug 07, 2002 4:06 pm
Location: Trowbridge, Wiltshire

Re: system requirements

Postby gptech on Thu Mar 23, 2017 3:01 am

Personally I'd walk away..

From a review of the A6-6400 (http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/a6-6400k-vs-pentium-g3220-cpu-review/)

After benchmarking the A6-6400K and the Pentium G3220, which are direct competitors, as both have the exact same price tag in the United States, we can say with confidence that the Pentium G3220 has a higher processing power than the A6-6400K. It may be a surprise for some users who still link processing performance to clock rate, since the contender from AMD has a higher clock rate than the Intel’s (3.9 GHz vs. 3.0 GHz). In truth, clock rates are only meaningful when comparing CPUs with the same internal architecture, which is not the case.

On the other hand, the 3DMark and the F1 2013 tests (other recent games did not run with at least one of the CPUs) suggest the integrated GPU of the A6-6400K is faster than the one embedded in the Pentium G3220. While it is not powerful enough to run recent games in higher resolutions and/or image quality settings, the Radeon HD 8470D engine included in the A6-6400K can actually run older games at a decent frame rate, which means this CPU can be a better solution for the casual gamer who wants an inexpensive system to run older games.


and one covering the R7 240 (http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/radeon-r7-240-and-250,review-32874.html)

Then again, a low-cost Radeon R7 240 manages playable performance at 1920x1080 in some games, so long as you're willing to except the lowest-quality settings available


It's basically a low powered machine, probably a very capable one but is unlikely to be a worthwhile long term investment.

For less than the cost of a new machine, consider just replacing the motherboard, CPU and RAM in your existing PC--https://www.cclonline.com/product/219955/NoMfgCode/Motherboard-Bundles/CCL-Advantage-Intel-Motherboard-Bundle/MBB-INT-ADV/ is just one of many bundles available and at £330 is a nice cheap way into the latest technology. OK, no GPU is included but your existing card will probably fare well enough until you can afford another, and the 160 quid or so you'll have saved over a new system goes a long way towards getting you a 960/970/1060 or even get you a 1050 immediately.

Fairly easy to fit, if you can make a screwdriver turn you've all the skills required to do the job. You'd have to check that your PSU offered all the right power connecters of course, and that your disc drives would connect.
gptech
Very Active Forum Member
 
Posts: 12361
Joined: Fri Oct 10, 2008 5:48 pm
Location: Wakefield, West Yorkshire


Return to [TS13-TS17] General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 27 guests