US Steam Loco Plans

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US Steam Loco Plans

Postby sundog on Mon Aug 09, 2004 8:15 pm

Talking about steam locos on another thread reminded me of a book I managed to pick up a month or so ago. It's a collection of drawings and plans entitled "100 Years of Steam Locomotives" by Walter A. Lucas, printed 1957. There are 278 pages, and apart from the introduction, every other page consists of a scale drawing and or plan of individual locos.

It's a shame as I'm useless at 3D modelling for MSTS, but it does graphically convey what giants some of these locos are: photos are one thing, but when you can see actual dimensions.......

Maybe if/when the Dooner Pass gets released some talented person(s) will turn their attention to some of these locos. I can only hope!

Cheers
Ken
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Postby kevarc on Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:31 pm

I have a few drawings of Wabash and NYC stuff. Plus http://gelwood.railfan.net/index.html has a good group of PRR drawings. A friend of mine had the chance to get the builders drawings of RI and a couple other RR's when they were doing away with steam. Unfortunately he did not take them up on their offer. He had the same problem, where to keep them. He wishes he had now.
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Postby sundog on Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:44 pm

That's why I grabbed this book when I had the opportunity. I've often kicked myself in the past for not picking up something that caught my eye. Although it's not the original book (the whole book had been reproduced as copies, and at 280+ pages that's some feat!!) it only cost £4. I just had a gut feeling that maybe sometime in the future......

Also, a while back, I managed to pick up on US Ebay a reproduction of the SCL Diesel Data Book. Apart from tech specs there are also side drawings of every Diesel for the SCL roster for 4/24/78.

Jeez - the amount of books I've acquired over the past. My wife's dreading when I kick the bucket! :o :lol: :angel:

Cheers
Ken
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Postby kevarc on Mon Aug 09, 2004 9:48 pm

Yep, mine wife complains also. We redid her office and put up 7' long shelves, my trains magazines and books took up almost 3 shelves.
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Postby sundog on Mon Aug 09, 2004 10:06 pm

LOL - well it's nice to share!

My missus reckons when I go the books will go too - it should make for a fair blaze when I'm cremated!
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Postby mccormackpj on Wed Aug 25, 2004 8:09 am

I put up 16 metres of shelving four years ago and already there are piles of other books all over the floor. Given the prices paid for 2nd hand railway books, I believe my wife should see this as an investment which she can realise when I go past the final ticket barrier!

The Gelwood site has fantastic detail, but are the PRR diagrams sufficient for MSTS modelling? If so, then Steam Locomotives of the Baltimore & Ohio, An All-time Roster by William Edson, ISBN 0-9632913-0-0 gives equivalent quality diagrams for the B&O.

There was a series of compilations from Locomotive Cyclopaedias from between the wars; I have No.14, which has detailed drawings of various 4-8-4s. Nos.1, 2, 6 & 9 have further locos. I haven't seen these for a long time - best bet is to search on http://www.abebooks.co.uk.

Finally there were a large number of Loco Profiles devoted to North American steam: No.2 - NYC Hudsons, 6 - Mallets, 14 - PRR Pacifcs, 16 - UPRR 4-12-2s, 20 - 4-8-4s, 24 - PRR Duplexii, 26 - Milwaukee Hiawathas, 28 - SPRR Cab-in-fronts, 31 - Lima super-power, 35 - CPR Selkirks. All these have plentiful illustrations, a beautiful colour drawing of the loco and sometimes line drawings. Again, try http://www.abebooks.co.uk for these.

There are many good bookshops in the US, and often - if you can live with the slow delivery by surface mail - much cheaper than in the UK. I use http://www.karensbooks.com but if you look in the back of Trains or Classic Trains magazines you will see plenty of others.

Good hunting! And if you don't make a model for MSTS, you can still dream and drool over what was the greatest steam spectacular on the planet.

Patrick
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Postby decapod on Wed Aug 25, 2004 8:28 am

I am starting to think about building a US steam loco, it won't happen for a while yet (I have 3-4 others to finish first), but I will need to start looking into it soon.

I'm open to suggestions.

I'm also quite keen on the really old stuff - Cramptons and possibly John Bull.
DECAPOD
OOOOO
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Postby mccormackpj on Wed Aug 25, 2004 9:09 am

The B&O book I mentioned has some drawings of the earlier stuff, and the NYC book by Al Staufer has info on 'Lightning', the Utica & Schenectady Crampton. Staufer's B&O Power book has some drawings also - it would be nice to see a Winans 'Mud-digger'! There are some early 0-8-0s available on train-sim.

I particularly like the early photos of US railways, with the 4-2-0s with cabs like beach huts! Those and the Civil War pictures are highly atmospheric and look oddly more 'alive' than similar ones on this side of the Pond. Another strangeness I often forget was the number of gauges used on mainlines: 4'8.5", 4'10", 5', 5'4", 5'6" and 6'. It wasn't until 1880 that the Erie finally converted from 6' to the coal waggon gauge. How about some new track gauges? This would make the requests for 5'3" and 2' look modest!

Patrick
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Postby decapod on Wed Aug 25, 2004 11:01 am

mccormackpj wrote:
I particularly like the early photos of US railways, with the 4-2-0s with cabs like beach huts!


I've got a good pic of a 6-2-0 crampton from 1848, with 9' driving wheels and "garden shed" sitting between them

It looked a bit like this....
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Postby mccormackpj on Wed Aug 25, 2004 5:22 pm

Oh yum-yum! I knew I had seen a 6-2-0 somewhere - was this an Erie loco or one from a constituent of the NYC? Presumably they had extra-heavy crew to give the thing some adhesion :D

I have just got home from Camden Miniatures where I found a copy of Locomotive Cyclopaedia No.1. It's full of drawings of late 19th and 20th century locos from wee 0-4-0 switchers to the mighty C&O Alleghany 2-6-6-6. Go to http://www.camdenmin.co.uk and get in touch to find the price (it wasn't on the copy).

Now I'm off on the trail of Argentine Central 4-8-0 two cylinder compounds!

Patrick
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Postby mccormackpj on Wed Aug 25, 2004 5:40 pm

Rereading Sundog's initial message, I wonder whether his 100 Years of Steam Locomotives is not the same as LC No.1? There are 2nd hand copies of the former on http://www.abebooks.co.uk starting at £18.

Patrick
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Postby sundog on Wed Aug 25, 2004 7:48 pm

Hi

Sorry for chipping in, but I don't think either The Locomotive Cyclopedia Vol 1, or A History of the American Locomotive is the same as the one I picked up. Apart from the difference in titles, the number of pages doesn't tally either. The publisher of my book was Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corporation, New York.

There are some pretty early locos (1850's) in my book, but nothing like the 3D model of the 6-2-0(?). It does include quite a few articulateds though.

Although mine's a fascinating book, not every drawing goes beyond a side plan.

Cheers
Ken
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Postby mccormackpj on Wed Aug 25, 2004 8:41 pm

Ken -

Not the same obviously, thought that the reference to Loco Cyclopaedia as the common source might mean there was duplication. I await enlightenment from Martin about the parentage of the 6-2-0 - I'm sure I've seen it somewhere, but can't find it (sounds of thrashing thro' pages of Al Staufer's books and crashing piles of tottering volumes in the Haunted Library here at McCormack Towers).

Patrick
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Postby sundog on Wed Aug 25, 2004 9:08 pm

Hi Patrick

Thanks for the link to the Camden shop anyway - there are some interesting titles amongst their lists, that's for sure!

Uncanny how most of us have the ability to remember something quite obscure, but never quite clearly enough to remember exactly where it was we saw it. Many's the time I've had to dive into piles of books/magazines in a frenzied search for something. And that's why we amass all these volumes about so many different subjects - for just such an occasion. The concept's totally missed by my missus though. There's summat odd about women IMHO! :o

Cheers
Ken
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